Riddle #12

Travel around the world

What can travel around the world while staying in a corner?
A stamp.
91.77 %
30 votes

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logicmath

In a bank

A women walks into a bank to cash out her check. By mistake the bank teller gives her rupee amount in change, and her paise amount in rupees. On the way home she spends 5 paise, and then suddenly she notices that she has twice the amount of her check. How much was her check amount ?
The check was for Rupees 31.63. The bank teller gave her Rupees 63.31 She spent .05, and then she had Rupees 63.26, which is twice the check. Let x be the rupees of the check, and y be the paise. The check was for 100x + y paise He was given 100y + x paise Also 100y + x - 5 = 2(100x + y) Expanding this out and rearranging, we find: 98y = 199x + 5 or 199x ≡ -5 (mod 98) or 98*2*x + 3x ≡ -5 (mod 98) 3x ≡ -5 ≡ 93 (mod 98) this quickly leads to x = 31
90.47 %
44 votes

logicmath

Strange Miles

You are somewhere on Earth. You walk due south 1 mile, then due east 1 mile, then due north 1 mile. When you finish this 3-mile walk, you are back exactly where you started. It turns out there are an infinite number of different points on earth where you might be. Can you describe them all? It's important to note that this set of points should contain both an infinite number of different latitudes, and an infinite number of different longitudes (though the same latitudes and longitudes can be repeated multiple times); if it doesn't, you haven't thought of all the points.
One of the points is the North Pole. If you go south one mile, and then east one mile, you're still exactly one mile south of the North Pole, so you'll be back where you started when you go north one mile. To think of the next set of points, imagine the latitude slighty north of the South Pole, where the length of the longitudinal line around the Earth is exactly one mile (put another way, imagine the latitude slightly north of the South Pole where if you were to walk due east one mile, you would end up exactly where you started). Any point exactly one mile north of this latitude is another one of the points you could be at, because you would walk south one mile, then walk east a mile around and end up where you started the eastward walk, and then walk back north one mile to your starting point. So this adds an infinite number of other points we could be at. However, we have not yet met the requirement that our set of points has an infinite number of different latitudes. To meet this requirement and see the rest of the points you might be at, we just generalize the previous set of points. Imagine the latitude slightly north of the South Pole that is 1/2 mile in distance. Also imagine the latitudes in this area that are 1/3 miles in distance, 1/4 miles in distance, 1/5 miles, 1/6 miles, and so on. If you are at any of these latitudes and you walk exactly one mile east, you will end up exactly where you started. Thus, any point that is one mile north of ANY of these latitudes is another one of the points you might have started at, since you'll walk one mile south, then one mile east and end up where you started your eastward walk, and finally, one mile north back to where you started.
90.26 %
43 votes

cleanlogicmath

Take 2 from 5

How can you take 2 from 5 and leave 4?
F I V E. Remove the 2 letters F and E from five and you have IV.
90.04 %
42 votes

logicmath

Tiling Without Corners

You can easily "tile" an 8x8 chessboard with 32 2x1 tiles, meaning that you can place these 32 tiles on the board and cover every square. But if you take away two opposite corners from the chessboard, it becomes impossible to tile this new 62-square board. Can you explain why tiling this board isn't possible?
Color in the chessboard, alternating with red and blue tiles. Then color all of your tiles half red and half blue. Whenever you place a tile down, you can always make it so that the red part of the tile is on a red square and the blue part of the tile is on the blue square. Since you'll need to place 31 tiles on the board (to cover the 62 squares), you would have to be able to cover 31 red squares and 31 blue squares. But when you took away the two corners, you can see that you are taking away two red spaces, leaving 30 red squares and 32 blue squares. There is no way to cover 30 red squares and 32 blue squares with the 31 tiles, since these tiles can only cover 31 red squares and 31 blue squares, and thus, tiling this board is not possible.
90.26 %
43 votes

logicmystery

The Great Wall of China

An American, who had never been to any country other than the United States, travelled a long way to see a sight that very few people had seen. He was standing one day on solid ground when he saw the Great Wall of China with his own eyes. How come?
He was an astronaut standing on the moon - from where the Great Wall of China is visible.
66.68 %
67 votes