Logic riddles

logicmathstorycleanclever

In the land of Brainopia, there are three races of people: Mikkos, who tell the truth all the time, Kikkos, who always tell lies, and Zikkos, who tell alternate false and true statements, in which the order is not known (i.e. true, false, true or false, true, false). When interviewing three Brainopians, a foreigner received the following statements: Person 1: I am a Mikko. Person 2: I am a Kikko. Person 3: a. They are both lying. b. I am a Zikko. Can you help the very confused foreigner determine who is who, assuming each person represents a different race?
Person 1 is a Miko. Person 2 is a Ziko. Person 3 is a Kikko.
72.39 %
103 votes
cleanstorylogicclever

After recent events, Question Mark is annoyed with his brother, Skid Mark. Skid thought it would be funny to hide Question's wallet. He told Question that he would get it back if he finds it. So, first off, Skid laid five colored keys in a row. One of them is a key to a room where Skid is hiding Question's wallet. Using the clues, can you determine the order of the keys and which is the right key? Red: This key is somewhere to the left of the key to the door. Blue: This key is not at one of the ends. Green: This key is three spaces away from the key to the door (2 between). Yellow: This key is next to the key to the door. Orange: This key is in the middle.
The order (from left to right) is Green, Red, Orange, Blue, Yellow. The blue key is the key to the door.
72.35 %
107 votes
funnylogictricky

If a blue house is made out of blue bricks, a yellow house is made out of yellow bricks and a pink house is made out of pink bricks, what is a green house made of?
Glass.
72.35 %
107 votes
logicmathcleanclever

What is the value of 1/2 of 2/3 of 3/4 of 4/5 of 5/6 of 6/7 of 7/8 of 8/9 of 9/10 of 1000?
100. Looks hard? Don't worry, just work it backwards and you'll find it very easy.
72.34 %
56 votes
logicmath

If, Fernando + Alonso + McLaren = 6 Fernando x Alonso = 2 Alonso x McLaren = 6 Then, McLaren x Fernando = ?
3 or 0.75 Explanation: Rewriting the last 2 equations in terms of Alonso, Fernando = 2/Alonso McLaren = 6/Alonso Replacing above values in equation "Fernando + Alonso + McLaren = 6" 2/Alonso + Alonso + 6/Alonso =6 (2 + Alonso^2 + 6)/Alonso = 6 8 + Alonso^2 = 6Alonso Alonso^2 - 6Alonso + 8 = 0 (Alonso - 4) (Alonso - 2) = 0 Therefore; Alonso = 4 or 2 Let's take value of Alonso as 2 Fernando = 2/2 = 1 McLaren = 6/2 = 3 Therefore; McLaren x Fernando = 3 x 1 = 3 Let's take value of Alonso as 4 Fernando = 2/4 = 0.5 McLaren = 6/4 = 1.5 Therefore; McLaren x Fernando = 1.5 x 0.5 = 0.75
72.33 %
69 votes
logiccleansimpleclever

A man needs to send important documents to his friend across the country. He buys a suitcase to put the documents in, but he has a problem: the mail system in his country is very corrupt, and he knows that if he doesn't lock the suitcase, it will be opened by the post office and his documents will be stolen before they reach his friend. There are lock stores across the country that sell locks with keys. The only problem is that if he locks the suitcase, he has no way to send the key to his friend so that the friend will be able to open the lock: if he doesn't send the key, then the friend can't open the lock, and if he puts the key in the suitcase, then the friend won't be able to get to the key. The suitcase is designed so that any number of locks can be put on it, but the man figures that putting more than one lock on the suitcase will only compound the problem. After a few days, however, he figures out how to safely send the documents. He calls his friend who he's sending the documents to and explains the plan. What is the man's plan?
The plan is this: 1. The man will put a lock on the suitcase, keep the key, and send the suitcase to his friend. 2. The friend will then put his own lock on the suitcase as well, keep the key to that lock, and send the suitcase back to the man. 3. The man will use his key to remove his lock from the suitcase, and send it back to the friend. 4. The friend will remove his own lock from the suitcase and get to the documents. Search: Man-in-the-middle attack
72.33 %
69 votes
logiccleverstory

A monk leaves at sunrise and walks on a path from the front door of his monastery to the top of a nearby mountain. He arrives at the mountain summit exactly at sundown. The next day, he rises again at sunrise and descends down to his monastery, following the same path that he took up the mountain. Assuming sunrise and sunset occured at the same time on each of the two days, prove that the monk must have been at some spot on the path at the same exact time on both days.
Imagine that instead of the same monk walking down the mountain on the second day, that it was actually a different monk. Let's call the monk who walked up the mountain monk A, and the monk who walked down the mountain monk B. Now pretend that instead of walking down the mountain on the second day, monk B actually walked down the mountain on the first day (the same day monk A walks up the mountain). Monk A and monk B will walk past each other at some point on their walks. This moment when they cross paths is the time of day at which the actual monk was at the same point on both days. Because in the new scenario monk A and monk B MUST cross paths, this moment must exist.
72.33 %
69 votes
logicsimpleclean

A horse travels a certain distance each day. Strangely enough, two of its legs travel 30 miles each day and the other two legs travel nearly 31 miles. It would seem that two of the horse's legs must be one mile ahead of the other two legs, but of course this can't be true. Since the horse is normal, how is this situation possible?
The horse operates the mill and travels in a circular clockwise direction. The two outside legs will travel a greater distance than the inside ones.
72.32 %
86 votes