Simple riddles

cleanpoemssimple

Pronounced as one letter, And written with three, Two letters there are, And two only in me. I’m double, I’m single, I’m black blue and gray, I’m read from both ends, And the same either way.
Eye.
78.89 %
92 votes
cleversimpletricky

Elmer Johnson went to the hardware store to make a purchase for his house. He asked the store clerk, "How much will one cost?" The clerk thought for a moment and said, "Three dollars." Elmer Johnson, who looked a little puzzled said, "Well then, how much will twelve cost?" "Six dollars," replied the clerk. Elmer Johnson scratched his head and said, "If I were to purchase two hundred, how much would that cost?" "That," said the clerk, "will cost you nine dollars." What was Elmer Johnson buying?
He was buying house numbers.
78.87 %
63 votes
simplelogictricky

You see a boat filled with people. It has not sunk, but when you look again you don't see a single person on the boat. Why?
All the people were married.
78.87 %
63 votes
logicsimpleclean

Even though the odds are always in favor of the gambling house, why does the establishment insist on a house limit on stakes?
Every casino in the world would go bankrupt without a house limit on stakes. Without it, gamblers would keep doubling their stakes until they won. No matter how bad a losing streak they were on, they would eventually win. For more information, search: Martingale
78.86 %
51 votes
simplelogicmathcleverclean

An infinite number of mathematicians are standing behind a bar. The first asks the barman for half a pint of beer, the second for a quarter pint, the third an eighth, and so on. How many pints of beer will the barman need to fulfill all mathematicians' wishes?
Just one.
78.85 %
57 votes
logicsimplecleanstory

A king has 100 identical servants, each with a different rank between 1 and 100. At the end of each day, each servant comes into the king's quarters, one-by-one, in a random order, and announces his rank to let the king know that he is done working for the day. For example, servant 14 comes in and says "Servant 14, reporting in." One day, the king's aide comes in and tells the king that one of the servants is missing, though he isn't sure which one. Before the other servants begin reporting in for the night, the king asks for a piece of paper to write on to help him figure out which servant is missing. Unfortunately, all that's available is a very small piece that can only hold one number at a time. The king is free to erase what he writes and write something new as many times as he likes, but he can only have one number written down at a time. The king's memory is bad and he won't be able to remember all the exact numbers as the servants report in, so he must use the paper to help him. How can he use the paper such that once the final servant has reported in, he'll know exactly which servant is missing?
When the first servant comes in, the king should write down his number. For each other servant that reports in, the king should add that servant's number to the current number written on the paper, and then write this new number on the paper. Once the final servant has reported in, the number on the paper should equal (1 + 2 + 3 + ... + 99 + 100) - MissingServantsNumber Since (1 + 2 + 3 + ... + 99 + 100) = 5050, we can rephrase this to say that the number on the paper should equal 5050 - MissingServantsNumber So to figure out the missing servant's number, the king simply needs to subtract the number written on his paper from 5050: MissingServantsNumber = 5050 - NumberWrittenOnThePaper
78.85 %
57 votes